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Table 6 Comparison of incidence rate of military parachute injuries

From: Incidence and risk factors associated with injuries during static line parachute training in Royal Thai Army

InvestigationStudy designInjury case definitionSampleType of parachutingIncidence rate (/1000)
Knapik et al. [2], 2011Prospective studyPhysical damage to body reported by medics in the drop zoneThe 82nd Airborne Division of the XVIII Airborne Corps; trained paratroopers in training exercisesStatic line10.5
Hughs et al. [4], 2008Retrospective studyInjuries recorded in unit medical records4th Battalion Royal Australian Regiment; trained paratroopers in training exercisesStatic line50.5
Farrow [5], 1992Prospective studyPhysical damage to body requiring evacuation from drop zone, withdrawal from exercise, duty restriction, or hospitalization (excluded abrasions and lacerations)Parachute Battalion Group, Australia; trained paratroopers in training exercisesStatic line7.1
Dhar [6], 2007Retrospective studyReferred cases for parachute related injuries from local military unitNot clearly statedNot clearly statedMinor injuries = 13.5
Major injuries = 9.0
Deaton and Roby [7], 2010Prospective studyAny personnel reporting to the military surgeon for care related to airborne operations in the drop zone and placed on limited dutyUS Marine Reconnaissance unit in Iraq; trained paratroopers in training exercisesStatic line8.23
Essex-Lopresti [9], 1946Retrospective studyAny physical damage recorded in drop zone by medical officer6th Airborne Division, United Kingdom; trained paratroopers in training exercisesStatic line21.0